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DISC 1

1. Danchone-Bushi - Chiemi Eri
2. Nangoku Tosa O Atonishite - Peggy Hayama
3. Brown Leaves - Hiroshi Mizuhara
4. Kusatsu Bushi - The Tokyo Cuban Boys
5. Oranda Yashiki No Hana - The Japanese Modernaires Orchestra And Singers
6. Hanagasa-Odori - Chiemi Eri
7. Kuroda Bushi - The Tokyo Cuban Boys
8. Yunta Koishiya Natsukashiya - Peggy Hayama
9. Musume Sendo-San - The Japanese Modernaires Orchestra And Singers
10. Lullaby Of The Birds - Hikari Saotome
11. Otomi-San - The Japanese Modernaires Orchestra And Singers
12. Yosakoi Shigure - Peggy Hayama
13. Fukagawa Kuzushi - Chiemi Eri
14. Okosa Bushi - The Tokyo Cuban Boys
15. Farewell To Tokyo - Keiko Matsuyama
16. Yu-hi Wa Haruka - The Japanese Modernaires Orchestra And Singers
17. Konpira Fune Fune - Chiemi Eri
18. Jhougashima No Ame - Peggy Hayama

 

DISC 2

1. Sangai-Bushi - The Tokyo Cuban Boys
2. Ringo Mura Kara - The Japanese Modernaires Orchestra And Singers
3. Shimabara Cihou Komoriuta - Peggy Hayama
4. Black Flower Petal - Hiroshi Mizuhara
5. Shinonome-Bushi - Chiemi Eri
6. Ringo Oiwake - The Japanese Modernaires Orchestra And Singers
7. Inori O Anata Ni - Peggy Hayama
8. Sanosa - The Tokyo Cuban Boys
9. Hakone Hachiri - Chiemi Eri
10. The Nikko Folksong - Hikari Saotome
11. Ina No Koi-Uta - The Japanese Modernaires Orchestra And Singers
12. Asadoya Yunta - The Tokyo Cuban Boys
13. Cigarette Blues - Kiyoshi Sakazume
14. Yakko-San - Chiemi Eri
15. Ringo No Hana Wa Saita Kedo - The Japanese Modernaires Orchestra And Singers
16. Tsume - Peggy Hayama
17. Okosa-Bushi - Chiemi Eri
18. Hibari No Madorosu-San - The Japanese Modernaires Orchestra And Singers

Café Tokyo

Artist VARIOUS ARTISTS

Format 2CD

Cat No NOT2CD659

Bar-Code 5060143496592

Availability: In stock

OR

The music on this compilation comes from a time long before the modern J Pop behemoth. In the early 50s, the music brought by occupying forces was embraced by the country’s youth. At the military clubs which opened up throughout the country, Japanese artists learned to play the popular American styles, such as jazz, country, mambo, and rock’n’roll. They later developed into a hybrid style known as kayōkyoku, which fused western rhythms and melodies together with traditional folkloric themes and vibrato vocal techniques peculiar to the indigenous strain of music called min’yō. Enchanted by the west, but with one eye always on its own traditions, the music on this compilation presents an entertainingly vivid snapshot of Japan in the mid-20th century. So grab a kohii (coffee) - or sake should you be so inclined, and dive in.

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